Program Management Blog

September 7, 2009

Multi-tasking, not productive, but reductive.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Milt @ 10:06 PM

For many years I have been spewing that multitasking does not work and that when attending meetings and conference calls, the proper behavior is to drop all other work and dedicate yourself to the event at hand. And every time I do this at a presentation, some well-to-do tells me I don’t get it and that multi-tasking is essential to today’s work. In other words – Dave you are stupid????

What really drives my opinion was the lost time involved with multi-tasking. It is a selfish habit that basically tells your co-workers their time is not important. They often can’t answer questions, or ask that the question be repeated. Then they proudly state that they were busy multi-tasking and not paying attention. So collective hours are lost, so that individual can read an email??????

Well, studies are now showing that multi-tasking doesn’t work. Not only does it waste other people’s time, multi-taskers in and of themselves are less productive, recall less information, and is not a skill – but a liability.

The first study is from a Stanford University study and is detailed at: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2009/august24/multitask-research-study-082409.html . This one demonstrates that multi-taskers are easily distracted, and suggest that even though a person may be multi-tasking, it doesn’t mean the other task is necessary or important.

A second study in The New Atlantis (http://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/the-myth-of-multitasking) suggests the cost to multi-tasking in productivity exceeds a billion dollars a year.

Finally, many jurisdictions are starting to enact laws prohibiting multi-tasking in the car. You can’t text and drive, you can’t cell phone and drive, and you most likely can’t participate in a web meeting and drive (no matter how cool the app!).

So how do we handle this when the guilty parties think they are not only doing good, but superior, work to their peers and the non-multi-taskers are actually slackers? First is calling them out on it. When sending a meeting invite add a request that nobody multi-tasks. All our time is valuable and we would hate to waste it by re-explaining something because you were multitasking.

Second, send a note after a meeting to them, and their boss, explaining the disappointment that they are not able to concentrate on your project. Ask what activity is more important and what you as a project manager have to do so they can concentrate on the tasks in your project.

Finally, have them repeat something that was said, especially if it involves a task they are responsible for, if they know they are subject to public scrutiny, they may pay more attention.

To me the bottom line is simple; I used to think I could multitask with the best of them, but found out I was fooling myself. I could do 3 things that would take 10 minutes each for a total of 30 minutes, or I could multi-task and do them in 20 minutes and thus more productive. However, this did not account for having to perhaps rework one of the tasks, or the opportunity cost of not paying full attention to one tasks, or worst of all, having to revisit something a decision made by the team that sought you input, but you weren’t paying attention so it was agreed to.

So in response to the people who say I don’t get it, you’re right. I don’t get why you spend time trying to do more than one thing at a time and risk reducing the quality of your work and your reputation. And I would also challenge that a lot of the multi-tasks are work that really didn’t need to be done!!!!

 

Dave Davis, PMP

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September 6, 2009

Dave Davis PMP, PgMP, ITIL, MBA, Six Sigma Presentation Library

Filed under: Uncategorized — Milt @ 8:55 PM

 


Dave Davis is a certified PMP and has been actively involved in the science of project management the last 22 years. He is a six sigma certified green belt, currently working on his black belt and possesses a masters certificate in e-business Project Management from the University of British Columbia. He has performed many roles in implementing program management tools including application administration, report writer, program manager, project manager, user of the data, and defender of the paradigm shift.

 

Dave has a breadth of experience in many areas of project management and is currently managing the XML business process analysis organization and is on the steering committee for the program office for the AT&T eBonding organization. He has managed projects ranging from small internal projects to multi-million dollar supply chain integration projects. The AT&T Project Management Center of Excellence has recognized Dave’s Project Management skills by bestowing several honors upon him including 1) Organization excellence, 2) Multiple Project Management Excellence Awards, 3) Project Management Achievement Award for implementing an Integrated Project Management Information System.

 

PMI PresentationBesides a PMP, Dave is certified as a Program Management Professional (PgMP), ITIL Foundations, and currently working on Certified Business Aanalys Professional (CBAP). He also holds 3 master’s degrees including an MBA from Xavier University, Certificate of eBusiness Project Management from the University of British Columbia, and a MA from Mt. St. Joseph . He is the charter sponsor of the Western Lake Erie Chapter of the Project Management Institute, the Executive Advisor Chair of the PMI eBusiness SIG, an active member of the PMI PMO SIG group and he has published many articles and delivered presentations at professional conferences as well as previous PMI congress conferences.

 

 

Contents

Presentation Categories

Business Acumen

Acronym Stew – How Do Multiple Certifications Play Together

The Many Hats of a Business Professional

eBusiness

100 Days to Launch a Web Based Product

Examining Lessons Learned From Process Management When Implementing An eBond

eBusiness Project Management – Keys To Success

Project Management is the Only Path to Successful Enterprise Application Integration (EAI)

ITIL / ISO 20000

PM and BA Roles in Integrating an ITIL Service Across Multiple Companies

Leadership

Enthusiasm and Leadership – Are you making bricks or building a cathedral?

Leadership in the PMBOK Guide

Lessons Learned and Real Life Experience

Being an Evangelist for Portfolio Management

Tuesday It Must Be Belgium

Light, Yet Insightful

Project Management in Pop Culture

Schmoozing and Project Management

Peanuts and Cracker Jacks

A Philosophy of Project Management According to Meatloaf

Project Management Myth Busters

Santa Claus and the North PMOle

Discovering Project Management in Unusual Places

Program Management

Creating and Implementing Project Portfolio Management (PPM)

Geese and Program Management – An Analogy to Working Together for Successful Program Management

Scope / Change Control across the Portfolio

Portfolio Management and Six Sigma Projects

The Day in the Life of a Program Manager

Project Management Fundamentals

A Practitioner’s Approach to Project Governance

The Box Paradox

CRAIG and Project Management

Contemplating the Dull, Mundane, Picayune, Obscure, Essential Minutiae of Project Management – Part I (Not just for Newbie’s)

Soft Skills

Khavostism and Portfolio Management

Sometimes You’re the Lion, Sometimes the Gazelle, and Sometimes the Dung Beetle

Soft Skills – Hard Knocks

Techniques – How to Do

Using Storyboarding at Discovery Sessions to Define Business Rules and Use Cases

Why is Testing Such a Pain in the Pass?

Avoiding ‘Whack a Mole’ Program Management

Tools

5 Reasons Why Project Managers Will Resist Project Portfolio; Management Systems and 5 Reasons They Will Embrace It

Developing and Managing Project Maps for Enterprise Application Integration Repeatable Project

Project Management as a Contributor

Useful (and mostly free) Project Management Tools

Email, the Bi-polar Friend of ecommerce

Driving Down the Information Super Highway using PM Tools

Workshop

Rules of the Road – Creating a Governance Document

Progressive Elaboration – Using Mind Mapping Techniques to Develop a Project Plan

 

Presentation Categories

The presentations are divided into various categories in order to emphasise a specific area of concentration. The categories are defined in the table below.

Presentation Category

Description

Project Management Fundamentals

Presentations that help clarify the basic principles of Project Management as defined by The Project Management Institute© and the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK©) Guide.

Soft Skills

Communication and Soft Skills for Program Management, Project Management, Business Analysis, and Business Process Management. These are the ‘people skills’ that allow you to be effective in dealing with other humans on your work efforts. These skills include communication, problem resolution, praise, conveying bad news, and any other aspect that involves human emotional intelligence.

Program Management

Aligns with the Project Management© PgMP© Certification and Program and Portfolio Standards

Tools

Electronic Resources to help you do your job better. Tools can include desktop office applications, web based collaboration tools, business process management, and other ‘things’ that HELP you do your job better.

ITIL / ISO 20000

The aim of the ISO/IEC 20000 standard is to provide a common reference standard for all companies that deliver IT services for internal or external clients. One of its other objectives is to promote a common terminology which makes an important contribution towards communication between service provider, supplier and customer.

 

The ITIL core publications form a set of five manuals that illustrate a lifecycle model from service strategy, service design up to continuous service improvement. The manuals contain these titles and subjects:

Service Strategy

Service Design (models for productive operation)

Service Transition (service implementation/launch)

Service Operation (productive operation of services)

Continual Service Improvement

Lessons Learned and Real Life Experience

Things I have learned and observed in 28 years in the business world. These sessions will provide real life case studies among multiple organizations, insight into what went right and wrong, as well as how to do better.

eBusiness

The knowledge, tools, and techniques associated with all the project management environment of electronic business and commerce. This can include internet based applications, electronic devices that communicate via a network, Application to Application initiatives, and tools to make organizations more effective.

Techniques – How to Do

This includes specific examples and case studies of the application of theory, design, and tools to solve a business concern.

Light, Yet Insightful

These are sessions that convey significant business principles in a creative and light hearted way. Not technocratic, but instead these presentation look at various social and non-work situations and apply the work principle.

Business Acumen

This describes the fundamental of Business Administration and management and applies them to specific technical skills in program management, project management, business analysis, and process management. Acumen includes an understanding of: management, marketing, finance, accounting, product, price, packaging, logistics, etc.

Leadership

There is a difference between Management and Leadership. This series of topics will look at ‘leading people’ within projects. Leading implies aligning people with ideas, beliefs, and vision to accomplish change. It is not as focused on the metrics as management, but instead focused on tapping the emotional intelligence of individuals to realize common objectives.

Workshop

A technique in continuous learning, a workshop is a planned training session in which a specific skill will be taught using specific tools to utilize that skill. Workshops will involve hands-on activities with large amounts of discussion and shared learning.

 

Business Acumen

Acronym Stew – How Do Multiple Certifications Play Together

Have you ever had someone come up to you and ask you, what is a PMP and why would I want that certification? Or Why should I get a PMP instead of an MBA? or What is the best certification I should get? Are you at a loss for an answer beyond “It depends?”

This will look at various certifications in today’s “Improve the Business Environment”, what they mean, which one may be best for you.

The Many Hats of a Business Professional

A major aspect of project manager is managing the expectations of the project key stakeholders. With that ‘soft skill’ responsibility, the project manager will assume different roles at different times during the project. This presentation takes a look at those various roles and provides Lessons Learned, best practices and ways to avoid negatives.

 

eBusiness

100 Days to Launch a Web Based Product

Launching a web based product interface is a program in and of itself. Besides insuring the product is available and meets business needs, there are many other organizations involved in a successful launch. This presentation covers a proven process for launching a web base product.

The presentation will cover the planning and execution of an International Web Product release including a release template. This encompasses all aspect of a release including testing, training, business process management, and launch.

Examining Lessons Learned From Process Management When Implementing An eBond

This session will cover a variety of lessons learned accumulated over the past 5 years of implementing application to application eBond between AT&T and global customers. These lessons learned will focus on process changes required at both organizations and the project management of implementing the change.

eBusiness Project Management – Keys To Success

This is a presentation developed by the PMI eBusiness SIG and explores the relationship between eBusiness and Project Management Principles as described in the PMBOK® Guide. This presentation has been delivered across the globe to sessions in Australia, North America, Asia, and Europe.

Project Management is the Only Path to Successful Enterprise Application Integration (EAI)

As more organizations embark on ‘e-bonding’ initiatives that specifically tie company critical applications together the number of challenges expands exponentially. An EAI project drives a blending of technology, business processes, cultures, and cross companies responsibilities. The only way for both organizations to succeed is to adhere to the principles or project management. This includes a library of project artifacts and strict process for baselining scope, work breakdown structures and test plans, as well as stringent change control.

 

ITIL / ISO 20000

PM and BA Roles in Integrating an ITIL Service Across Multiple Companies

The Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is a standard that defines specific phases of Service Delivery and Service Assurance. This presentation will look at various components of implementing an electronic bonded ITIL Service Desk across multiple companies.

 

Leadership

Enthusiasm and Leadership – Are you making bricks or building a cathedral?

Enthusiasm of the leader is the best motivational factor there is, if the leader isn’t charged and motivating, then there will be little motivation.

 

This presentation looks at enthusiasm, leadership, and team motivation and how it applies to project management, program management, requirements management, and process engineering.

 

Leadership in the PMBOK Guide

I have sometimes heard that we should use the phrase “Project Leader” instead of “Project Manager” The PMBOK Guide uses the word leader or leadership 76 times in version 4.0. So what does leadership and project management mean?

This presentation will explore leadership and project manager. What constitutes leadership, how leaderships need to communicate in various motivational styles or multiple people can resonate with the message, and how a leader needs to navigate “choppy waters”.

 

Lessons Learned and Real Life Experience

Being an Evangelist for Portfolio Management

In a nutshell, this presentation is a case study of the challenges and successes on implementing a web base program management tool. The organization integrates customer applications and the program has over 640 projects and 18 project managers. The presentation is technology independent; it looks at the human aspect of implementation; including the administrator, the champion perspective, the program manager, and the project manger perspectives.

 

Tuesday It Must Be Belgium

Lessons Learned from Implementing a Global ITIL Incident eBond. Look at the program, projects, tools and other aspects in implementing an ITIL based e-Bonding infrastructure for a global manufacturing company.

 

Light, Yet Insightful

 

Project Management in Pop Culture

Although the presentation is light in spirit, the message it delivers is significant and essential for a successful project manager! One of the basic components of project management is the examination of the project, identifying lessons learned, and applying these lessons to future projects. This presentation takes the project outside of the conference room and examines various components of Pop Culture and applies the principles of lessons learned to various components of Pop Culture.

 

Schmoozing and Project Management 

How do you get that uncooperative line manager to get more committed to your project?? How do you make all members of a geographically disperse team feel ownership for a project?? How do you make suppliers stay actively involved in your project?? You schmooze ’em. This presentation was given at the PMI Global Congress.

 

Peanuts and Cracker Jacks

Baseball, Hot Dogs, Apple Pie, Project Management. As western culture as it gets. This presentation looks at how a project manager can utilize the rich history of baseball to better manage projects and teams. In this light, yet insightful, presentation, Dave Davis does a detailed comparison of baseball and project management. 

 

A Philosophy of Project Management According to Meatloaf 

In the late 1970’s and even up to today, a rock singer named Meatloaf had several hit songs regarding the perils of life. This session will use some of the philosophy presented in those songs of this singer and compare them to the daily life of a project manager. This presentation will look at signs that signal the problem is approaching, ways to avoid it, ways to know when you’re in trouble, ways to minimize the damage, and ways to survive after the fact. This presentation will provide small little examples of different situations within the day of a project manager and address it accordingly. 

 

Project Management Myth Busters

This presentation will look at several project management myths and determine if they are plausible or busted. It is loosely based on the TV show of the same presences. Myths to be explored include:

1) Project management increases overhead

2) Project managers are nothing more than checklist checkers

3) Non certified project managers are as good as PMPs

4) Program Management is nothing more than enhanced project management

5) Project schedules are derived from the WBS and Project Charter

The presentation will look at various examples that either prove or disprove the myths and how the project manager’s skill set should be applied in each circumstance.

 

Santa Claus and the North PMOle

Let your imagination take control for an hour. Imagine you have an opportunity to understand one of the most amazing stories in project management lore.

Once a year, on Christmas Eve, Santa travels around the world in a reindeer powered sleigh to deliver presents to good behaving children and lumps of coal to bad behaving children. This annual excursion, as his staff of elves like to call it, is the culmination of multiple projects during the year. In order to accomplish this excursion , Santa, has implemented a Program Management Office, to ensure coordination of all the various components. Santa found some time in his busy schedule to discuss project management and how it makes his job easier.

 

Discovering Project Management in Unusual Places

Do you often find it difficult to explain what you do as a project manager or program manager? Do you sometimes have to explain the value proposition of project management to key stakeholders, customers, or other team members? Do you find it easy to use an analogy for explaining how things work, then this presentation is for you.

This will look for Project Management principles and applications in other context to help explain the value proposition.

 

Program Management

 

Creating and Implementing Project Portfolio Management (PPM)

In a nutshell, this presentation is a case study of the challenges and successes on implementing a web base program management tool. The presentation is technology independent, it looks at the human aspect of implementation; including the administrator , the champion perspective, the program manager, and the project manger perspectives.

 

Geese and Program Management – An Analogy to Working Together for Successful Program Management 

Implementing Program Management is much more of a journey than an event. The care and feeding of the projects is a constant demand for successful program / portfolio management. This presentation will use an analogy of geese and their migratory habits to describe the inter-relationship of various components of program management.

This presentation was given to the PMI Global Congress and is attacks the soft skills of organizational effectiveness.

 

Scope / Change Control across the Portfolio

A project is usually part of an integrated portfolio that is a roadmap for the realization of the business strategy. With this integration , it is important to be able to access how, or if, a change in one project impacts the scope or time line of another project. 

Additionally there may be a major external business event, such as a corporate merger or an ASP going bankrupt, that impacts several projects in the portfolio. This presentation will focus on ways to look at change across the integrated portfolio and mitigate risk for all initiatives being undertaken by an organization. This presentation will provide a detailed description of a Change Management Process and associated templates, approval process, and scheduling the change.

 

Portfolio Management and Six Sigma Projects

This presentation will focus on combining Six Sigma certification with Project Management Methodology and using a portfolio management application to define both areas. The presenter was the application administrator and this talk will focus on the business aspects of this engagement. This includes the project selection criteria, portfolio analysis, tracking of the projects, project charter and stewardship reports as well as using ARMI models and FEMA tools for Risk management and mitigation.

 

The Day in the Life of a Program Manager

The Project Management Institute now offers a certification in Program Management. The Program Management Professional (PgMP) implies a job responsibility that differs from a Project Manager. This difference begs the question “what Do You Expect to do as a Program Manager?”

I have to admit at first, I hadn’t seriously contemplated explaining the day in the life of a Program Manager. I knew it was more than a manager of multiple projects and that it often had a different audience than project readouts. Having been a program manager for over 3 years on customer implementation, I realized that I could probably look at how most of my time is spent and use that as a basis for defining Program Manager Expectations. This presentation looks at the job of a Program Manager and what a Program Manager does during a day.

 

Project Management Fundamentals

A Practitioner’s Approach to Project Governance

Do the members of your project team know what to do if an issue is assigned to them? Do they understand what a WBS is? Do they know how to communicate status? Do they know about Change Control? I imagine the answer to a lot of these questions is “I Think So”. Solve the problem with a Project Governance Document at the Project Kickoff.

 

The Box Paradox

A project is a unique piece of work with a defined beginning and a defined end. A Project Manager is expected to apply a “Methodology” while adhering to a “Process” using pre-defined “Templates” within the constraints of business financial management. Add to this equation the concept of Portfolio Management, which strives for consistent measurable deliveries with defined milestones and ownership requirements. To further complicate the paradox – project managers are encouraged to “think outside the box!” , while conforming to processes which are defined by boxes? A major challenge for project managers is to make sure that the tasks within the project fits within process models for various organizations. The Box Paradox expands in the fact that most organizations have well defined input criteria and prioritization processes. Unfortunately, there is rarely a consistent corporate framework where the same input is used across multiple organizations. The PM is then forced to insure the same project is properly initiated into each process. The “Project Integration” Knowledge Area that holds all the knowledge areas together. Project Governance is the collection of using tools and techniques to ensure all members of the team conform to the process and methodology. These areas provide the Project Manager with the most opportunity to think outside the box while working within the box. Without redefining the framework, the PM can use it to successfully navigate their project to completion and provide true value to the organization.

 

CRAIG and Project Management

CRAIG is an acronym for the following components of project management. Constraints Requirements Assumptions Integration Governance This presentation looks at these components and how the project manager must address them at a project level and a program manager must address them at a program level.

 

Contemplating the Dull, Mundane, Picayune, Obscure, Essential Minutiae of Project Management – Part I (Not just for Newbie’s) 

Helen Keller was quoted: “I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble.” . Although she was not a PMP, Ms. Keller definitely captures the essence of a project manager. The most successful project managers are able to accomplish the small tasks in a timely manner with quality. This presentation takes a look at the various tasks and chores that separate ‘exemplary’ project management from ‘good enough’ project management. 

 

Soft Skills

Khavostism and Portfolio Management

Khavostism refers to “making up your policy in reaction to your enemy”. So what does that have to do with project management ? Everything! Successful implementation of an Integrated Portfolio Management System (IPMS) is a People Issue, not a technology issue. Why do organizations resist it, while others embrace it? This presentation looks at the pragmatic issues (such as process and quality gates) and the social issue (adoption) of the tool. Dave has an article on his blog at:

http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/pm/dldavis/archives/khvostism-and-portfolio-management-14072


 

Sometimes You’re the Lion, Sometimes the Gazelle, and Sometimes the Dung Beetle

A major aspect of project manager is managing the expectations of the project key stakeholders. With that ‘soft skill’ responsibility, the project manager will assume different roles at different times during the project. This presentation takes a light-hearted look at those various roles and provides Lessons Learned, best practices and ways to avoid negatives.

 

Soft Skills – Hard Knocks

This presentation will use pattern matching and risk reduction to identify the alignment of soft skills and hard skills for a business professional. It will use the conclusions of the UBC Continuing Studies Advisory team and real-life case studies to present a comprehensive listing of skills, how to identify the training opportunities, and how to quantify the benefits of focusing on the soft skills.

 

Techniques – How to Do

Using Storyboarding at Discovery Sessions to Define Business Rules and Use Cases

The basic purpose of the Discovery Session is to establish a set of Business Rules that will be used to enforce the technical requirements. The storyboard will define the user experience with the business process by defining action triggers, customer inputs and business outputs The storyboard will have both a type of service that has a problem (Voice, Data, IP) and the nature of the problem (No Dial Tone, PING Does Not Respond) as primary characteristics. Business Process will then be used later to determine values associated with the scenarios. For example: What Close Code would be used in this situation.

 

Why is Testing Such a Pain in the Pass?

Many projects, especially IT development projects, depend on successful testing as a major stage gate in the process. Yet, time after time, organizations stumble when it comes to testing. The problems are deeply rooted in culture, undefined expectations, bad test plans, short cutting, and resource allocation.

 

Avoiding ‘Whack a Mole’ Program Management

Professionally, the term “desultory” could be used to describe the out of control situation of many programs in many organizations. (the dictionary definition is: desultory \DES-uhl-tor-ee\ (adjective) – 1 : Jumping or passing from one thing or subject to another without order or rational connection; disconnected; aimless. ) But it’s easier to resonate with the concept of the game ‘Whack a Mole’. This presentation does just that.

 

Tools

5 Reasons Why Project Managers Will Resist Project Portfolio; Management Systems and 5 Reasons They Will Embrace It

The title speaks for itself, Project Portfolio Management represents a challenge to all project managers’ comfort zones. Research indicates almost 70% of Integrated Portfolio Management System (IPMS) installations are abandoned within 3 years. A main reason involves the adoption of the tool by individual project managers. This presentation explores reasons Project Managers resist and/or embrace IPMS applications. This presentation helps prepare for enterprise wide adoption of the IPMS.

Adoption is the main challenge for any Integrated Portfolio Management Tool. Adoption represents a people challenge as opposed to a technology challenge.

This presentation has been given at the PMI Global Congress and includes survey results from over 200 practicing project managers on the challenges to adoption.

 

Developing and Managing Project Maps for Enterprise Application Integration Repeatable Project

This session is guided design process for developing and managing project maps. It will draw from 9 years experience in creating the project maps. The session will define an Enterprise Application Environment and a repeatable process project. A repeatable process project as a project that combines core business functionality with project management and many steps in the WBS are similar across various implementations and a core set of project artifacts can be reused. 

This presentation was given at the PMI Global Congress.

 

Project Management as a Contributor

Have you ever been a part of a larger project where you are not the overall project manager, but a contributor to the team? You have a unique role to be an influencer of the overall project manager and ensure that the project is managed in accordance with best practices and the PMBOK guide. However, you are also in a position to alienate the overall project managers and other members of the team. So you must utilize a combination of soft skills and hard skills to make it a win win for all parties. This presentation will examine your role of a “Project Management as a Contributor”

 

All these topics also apply to a Program Manager and how to manage the program and not the project and determine the sweet spot to balance the benefits realization, stakeholder management, and governance.

 

Useful (and mostly free) Project Management Tools

This presentation looks at tools that can help make the life of a project manager easier. It will look at a subset of tools and at least one template for each.

Exploring Useful Checklists, Templates, and Protocols – this presentation will help both the experienced and novice project managers better utilize tools to be more effective in managing expectations, communicating to key stakeholders, and analyzing project disposition.

 

Email, the Bi-polar Friend of ecommerce

In this presentation I explore how email is both a blessing and a curse to a business. While it offers a new correspondence channel, it also offers challenges to customer support, spam, and internet marketing. The presentation will include knowledge of eBusiness as the SIG Chairman and also Lessons Learned from implementing the “Write to Us” email channel for the AT&T BusinessDirect © web portal.

 

Driving Down the Information Super Highway using PM Tools

This presentation looks at tool functionality and how your organizational maturity and aptitude can embrace these tools at both the individual project level and the program level. 

 

Workshop

Rules of the Road – Creating a Governance Document

Do the members of your project team know what to do if an issue is assigned to them? Do they understand what a WBS is? Do they know how to communicate status? Do they know about Change Control? I imagine the answer to a lot of these questions is “I Think So”. Solve the problem with a Project Governance Document at the Project Kickoff. This session will cover how to create a governance document, how it relates to responsibility matrixes, and how the project manager will use it. Attendees will receive a governance template, a template user’s guide, and will work exercises to create the various components. This governance document is designed to work for both projects and programs and is assured to improve the success of project kick off meetings and set professional expectation of all stakeholders.

 

Progressive Elaboration – Using Mind Mapping Techniques to Develop a Project Plan

This learning experience combines soft and technical skills to capture stakeholder thoughts through a structured field validated method to manage the planning process. The Project Plan includes the following components:

1) PM Principles

2) Project Definition

3) Assumptions / Risk

4) Benefits Revenue and Cost

5) Stakeholders

a. RASIC Responsible Accountable Support Inform Collaborate

b. Scorecard

6) Governance

a. Tools

b. Communication

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